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No, not the American kind, which is sugary and dry. She’s likely talking about the Canadian Smarties, which are more like M&M. And M&M are addictive.

In short, she really wants that food fight.

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A music box ballerina spins around, so this mindset stems from within.

Relating to real life, some who suffer eating disorders feel dug into their condition. With anorexia, one might not want to give up their “better” body, and continue being miserable. This leads to day after day becoming monotonous, creating a stable but spiritually draining life.

She also mourns that the good (the world spinning) only happens with the bad (rain), and she realizes that she has to struggle to escape the cycle.

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Doubt:

She takes the bridge to reconsider her actions. On one hand, she wants freedom. On the other, she wants to stay safe. She might be unhappy inside the glass, but at least she knows she’ll be okay. If she escapes, she might die outside.

She evokes the image of birds to get this across. Birds are free, but open to the sky’s dangers.

But once the chorus comes back around, she chooses freedom. Sometimes, you have to smash through the fear.

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Metaphorically, this song depicts a music box ballerina who yearns to escape its container. She’s sick of rotating around day after day and want her soul to fly free—even if that involves becoming broken.

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She wants her metaphorical prison to not only be shattered, but also entirely erased, so she can forget about it as she reconnects with the world.

Magnets and springs are parts of a music box, which she’s asking to be dismantled. “Spiral” is some wordplay playing off of spring, which is in a spiral.

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Shampain is a portmanteau of “sham” and “pain”.

She drinks to drown her sorrows, but it only makes her feel guiltier and guiltier.

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He feels that when she left him, he was abandoned.

While this most revokes a bird with clipped wings, it segues into the next line, so it can also refer to a fallen angel.

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These lines provides the album’s title. He says in one interview the title’s inspiration:

It stems from a quote I heard that humans are a hybrid between angels and animals. I feel this dichotomy every waking second and finally put it in this brutally honest song.

In another interview, he explains the line in context:

We are who we are. It’s almost like a responsibility. You have to know when to use them and tame it.

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“V-Pop” is a clear play off of “k-pop” or “Korean pop”. Here, it means “violin pop”. The music will probably borrow from the East and be catchy and upbeat.

Unless in this case, it means “Vietnamese pop”, which would make a nice twist.

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The album cover directly references the title track, which is metaphorically about a music box ballerina. Lindsey is depicted with her violin, which a similar expression as seen on her debut album (although her violin lacks a Groncho disguise this time).

Also, the globe trapping her has cracks, which shows that she’s making an effort to break free with her music. However, in order to shatter the globe all the way, she needs the listener’s help to give her music an audience.

Hence the title. It’s an invitation.

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""Get Lucky," and "Lose Yourself To Dance."" (Rock Genius – #1 Daft Punk - Random Access Memories) | pending

“Get Lucky” by a mile. It’s an iconic throwback brought into modern times. “Lose Yourself To Dance” comes off as too anchored in the past.

Does anyone know whatever Charli XCX actually sings in this song, or is it just a writing feature?

"Na na na na, na na na na / Hey-ee ay-ee ay-ee ay ay-ee ay..." (Macklemore and Ryan Lewis – Can't Hold Us) | accepted

These simple lyrics are used unironically to amplify the song’s party atmosphere.

Hey, sometimes you have to let yourself go, surrender yourself to the night, and dance, dance, dance like you own and your people own it.

One of the lines that are repeated are repeated three times.

Shouldn’t some of the explanations be split?

"And yes, maybe just a touch of tourettes" (Nicki Minaj – Roman Holiday) | accepted

Not to mention Nicki Minaj just dropped a lot of curses and twitches.

"We can shoot a movie, we can bang like Rambo" (Nicki Minaj – Va Va Voom) | rejected

Nicki already pulled out the gun metaphors in “Roman Reloaded”, but she still has plenty of ammo left.

"My name is Onika, you can call me Nicki" (Nicki Minaj – Starships) | rejected

Something to add:

Also, unlike all the other promotional singles she had released for Roman Reloaded, she is rapping as herself, as opposed to her alter ego, Roman.

“Live fast, die young
Bad girls do it well”

Considering the Middle-Eastern vibe, the “bad girl” can be considered the ones which break out of their society’s rules.

“My oh me, my”

It’s actually “My, oh me, why?”